Guide: How to cite a Press release in Elsevier (numeric, with titles) style

Guide: How to cite a Press release in Elsevier (numeric, with titles) style

Cite A Press release in Elsevier (numeric, with titles) style

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Use the following template to cite a press release using the Elsevier (numeric, with titles) citation style. For help with other source types, like books, PDFs, or websites, check out our other guides. To have your reference list or bibliography automatically made for you, try our free citation generator.

Key:

Pink text = information that you will need to find from the source.
Black text = text required by the Elsevier (numeric, with titles) style.

Reference list

Place this part in your bibliography or reference list at the end of your assignment.

Template:

[1]Title, Year Published. http://Website-Url (accessed 10 October 2013).

Example:

[1] C. Schwartz, Marijuana May Stop The Spread Of HIV, The Huffington Post. (2014). http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/11/marijuana-hiv_n_4767901.html (accessed 28 April 2015).

In-text citation

Place this part right after the quote or reference to the source in your assignment.

Template

[1]

Example

Marijuana has long been used to effectively treat symptoms associated with HIV, such as chronic pain and weight loss. But a growing body of research suggests the plant may be able to stop the spread of the disease itself.

Adding to these findings is a Louisiana State University study published last week in the journal AIDS Research and Human Retroviruses. For 17 months, scientists administered a daily dose of THC, an active ingredient in cannabis, to monkeys infected with an animal form of the virus. Over the course of that period, scientists found that damage to immune tissue in the primates' stomachs, one of the most common areas in the body for HIV infection to spread, decreased.

"These findings reveal novel mechanisms that may potentially contribute to cannabinoid-mediated disease modulation," Dr. Patricia Molina, the study's lead author, wrote. The report goes on to explain that while HIV spreads by infecting and killing off immune cells, the monkeys that received the daily THC treatments maintained higher levels of healthy cells. [1]

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